Posted by Anthony Susi on 3/11/2019

Fido is part of the family, but sometimes he doesn’t quite know how to obey the family rules, and sometimes just doesn’t fit in the human-sized furniture. You’ve gone to great effort to design your home just the way you want it, but that doggy-bed in the middle of the floor somehow detracts from what you had in mind. Here are some delightful design ideas for making life at home with your four-legged friends more fun and less hassle.

Give a leg up

  • If your pet is small or getting a little older, add a step with style by using antique step stools or vintage children's chairs next to sofas and beds.
  • Cover a pet step with matching upholstery fabric or carpeting to blend in with your design.

Protect your place

  • Buy extra fabric when you order furniture to have made into cushion covers. That way, your pup can enjoy sitting on the sofa next to you, but when Aunt Millie comes for a visit, you can slip off the covers to show off your divine divan. Just send them out to the dry-cleaner's for a spruce up before you put them back on.
  • Little nails can scratch hardwood, so keep your pet’s nails trimmed, and place throw rugs in locations your little fur-ball uses frequently.
  • If your dog or cat scratches at the door, add plexiglass to the bottoms of your door panel with removable strips. Usable inside and out, the clear plastic covers allow your design to show through but keeps those doors protected.
  • Purchase pet beds that match the carpet to give design continuity.

Pack potential

Minding multiple pets quickly gets out of hand, so create an organizing space with hooks for leashes and outdoor gear. Keep toys at hand in a basket or bin. Set a water-proof mat or boot tray under food bowls for easy cleanup and make sure pet dishes work in the dishwasher for simple sanitation.

Store in style

Rather than keeping large unsightly bags of pet food, store it in more stylish containers such as adorable trash bins with lids, or inside a decorative hamper, basket, or crate.

If your pet prefers a crate at home, check out some of the stylish wood/metal combinations or pet crate/side table furniture so that your pet’s home blends right in with yours.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Anthony Susi on 12/4/2017

Moving can be fun, stressful, or both. If you and your family are moving soon, your mind might be racing with all of the preparations you need to make before the big day.

The best course of action is to start organizing and planning now so that you can rest easy the night before your move knowing that everything is accounted for.

In this article, we’ll show you how to do just that. We’ll talk about how to get the whole family involved in moving day, what to do with pets, and how to ensure the smoothest move possible so your family can look back on their first day in their new home with fond memories.

Getting organized

There are two key resources that you’ll need to make and refer back to as you prepare for moving day. You’ll need a calendar and a well-organised to-do list.

If you’re prone to depending on your smartphone, then it could be a good idea to add these items to your existing calendars and to-do list apps and sync them with your spouse and children. Most apps have this capability, making it easy to all stay on the same page.

Alternatively, you can use a physical calendar that it hung up in a highly visible area, such as on the refrigerator. Keep your to-do list next to it so you can cross off tasks as they’re accomplished.

On the calendar will be dates like calling your moving company for an appointment, closing on your new home, inspections, and confirming appointments with the movers and real estate agents. You’ll also want to pick a day close to your move to call and set up an appointment for utilities to be installed at your new home.

Getting the family involved

Every team needs a leader. If you’re leading your family through the moving process, it’s your responsibility to keep them in the loop. There may seem like an overwhelming number of tasks to achieve, but your family is there to help. Pick days to have your kids help you make boxes and pack the non-necessities.

You can make moving fun by “camping” inside your home for the last few nights. Since most of your belongings will be in boxes, it’s a fun excuse to set up a tent in the living room and take out the flashlights.

During the last day in your old house, make sure everyone has a survival kit filled with the items they’ll need when arriving at the new house. This includes toothbrushes, medication, phones and chargers, and other essentials.

Moving with pets

Moving can be even scarier for our pets than it is for us. There’s no way to explain to them what’s going on, and they’ll be looking to you for cues that everything is okay.

If you have a friend or relative who can take your pet to their home during the move it will make the moving process much easier--keeping track of a pet while you’re trying to carry boxes is no easy feat.

To ease your pet into their new home, take them to visit before the move if possible. Put some of their favorite toys or their bed and blanket in the new home so they’ll have some comforts for their first impression.


If you follow these tips you’ll be on your way to a fun, and mostly stress-free move into your new home with your family.




Tags: moving tips   pets   moving day   family  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Anthony Susi on 12/19/2016

Dogs, like humans, are territorial by nature. If a stranger came into your home unannounced you would likely react in either a fearful or aggressive manner. Dogs who are aggressive and protective are no different. Fortunately, there are training techniques that can be employed to help your pet grow more comfortable when you have company at your home. Whether you have an older dog who behaves aggressively toward visitors or you are raising a puppy that you want to train to be comfortable around strangers, here are some tips that can help.

Know your dog

Before you start training you need to understand exactly what makes your dog uncomfortable. With some dogs it may be a certain type of person (like a mail carrier or the oil delivery driver). With other dogs any stranger who comes in or near the home is a trigger. Determine the fine line between your dog's comfort zone and where your dog becomes scared.

Employing a training partner

Start small by having a friend (someone your dog doesn't know) walk past your home where the dog can see. The moment they show signs of fear, assure your dog that you have the situation under control. Scolding the dog, grabbing them, or otherwise exhibiting aggressive behavior toward your dog will only exacerbate their fears. You want them to know that you have the situation in control. Saying firmly and calmly, "I got it; I'm OK" will tell your dog that you see the stranger and you're in control. Oftentimes, dogs bark at strangers because they want us to be aware of the potential danger. Acknowledging your dog is vital in these situations. If your dog is the type who barks or growls at strangers, reward them with treats when they don't bark as the "stranger" passes by your home. From there, you can try other triggers with strangers outside the house such as ringing the doorbell or walking through the yard.

Let the stranger inside

After a few sessions working with the stranger outside your home, it's time to introduce your dog to strangers inside their territory. If you think your dog will be aggressive toward the stranger, make sure you keep your dog leashed or basket-muzzled during the first visit. It will protect your training buddy and will help let your dog know you are in control. Start by having a family member let the stranger in the home while you hold your dog leashed at length. If your dog barks at the stranger, attempt to get your dog's attention and verbally reassure them you are okay; you are in control. Have your training partner avoid eye contact with your dog. Once your dog calms down enough to stop barking, try having them follow commands for treats (sit, stay, etc.). If this is successful, have the stranger try tossing treats to the dog as well. If your dog is too nervous to eat, reward them with pets and other positive reinforcement ("Good girl!").

Tips for productive training sessions

  • Try to keep your dog's focus on you as often as you can. Use treats and positive reinforcement constantly
  • Exercise your dog before training if they are high-energy
  • Train in small increments; if your dog is afraid of strangers don't start by introducing him/her to a party at your home
  • You need to be calm at all times while training. Your dog takes his/her cues from your behavior. If you get frustrated or anxious take a break and start again when you're fully calm

   





Posted by Anthony Susi on 4/6/2015

It is the dog days of summer and the heat is on. During the warmer months it is important keep pets healthy and cool. Here are some tips to help keep your four-legged friends safe this summer: 1. Never leave pets alone in your car. Vehicles heat quickly in the sun, and animals left in them can suffer from heat stroke. This can happen in just a matter of minutes and is life threatening. 2. Do not exercise your pets in hot weather. If you want to get some exercise go in the early morning or late evening to prevent overheating. 3. Keep vaccinations up to date. Parvovirus, flourishes in hot weather and can be fatal to dogs. In the warmer weather pets also spend more time outdoors increasing the chances of encounters with wildlife and rabies. 4. Don't forget the heartworm medication. Heartworm is transmitted by mosquitoes, but it can be prevented by administering a monthly preventive between June and November. 5. Groom your pets. Daily brushing or combing lets you check for fleas and ticks. 6. Not all dogs can swim. Do not leave your dog unattended near water. Dogs can drown if they fall into water. 7. It is always the right season to spay or neuter your pet.